Thinking of Early Retirement? Make Sure You Are Prepared

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According to a recent Gallup poll, the average American retires at age 61. That’s at least five years away from collecting full Social Security retirement benefits, not to mention pensions, which typically begin at age 65, when available.  What’s more, Medicare coverage does not begin until age 65, leaving early retirees with potentially hefty health insurance premiums until Medicare kicks in.

Anyone contemplating early retirement will want to plan carefully and ask several important questions.

 

When Should You Begin Collecting Social Security?

 

You can begin collecting Social Security retirement benefits as early as age 62. But – you still face a significant reduction if you start before your normal retirement age: from 66 to 67, depending upon when you were born. Those choosing to collect before that age face a reduction in monthly payments by as much as 30%. Also, there is a stiff penalty for anyone who collects early and earns wages in excess of an annual earnings limit ($17,040 in 2018).

What age is best for you will ultimately depend upon your financial situation as well as your anticipated life expectancy.  For most people, waiting until normal retirement age is worth the wait.  But you may want to consider taking your benefits earlier if:

 

  • You are in poor health.
  • You are no longer working and need the benefit to help make ends meet.
  • You earn less than your spouse and your spouse has decided to continue working to help earn a better benefit.

How Will You Fund Health Care Costs?

 

A big obstacle to early retirement is health insurance. If you are working for a company that pays all or most of your health insurance, you could face hundreds of dollars in added monthly expenses if you retire before age 65. Plus, most companies no longer offer retiree health benefits, and if they do, the premiums can be high or the coverage low. In addition to health insurance premiums, there are also co-pays, annual out-of-pocket deductibles, uncovered procedures, and out-of-network costs to consider….not to mention dental and vision care costs.

 

What Will Early Retirement Mean for Your Investing and Withdrawal Strategies?

 

Perhaps the most significant concern for early retirees – and one that is often overlooked – is how retiring early will impact their investing and withdrawal strategies. Retiring early means taking larger distributions from your retirement savings in the early years until Social Security and pensions begin. This can have a significant impact on how long your savings last, much more so than if larger distributions are taken later in retirement.

 

Consider the following:

 

  • Delay withdrawals from tax-favored retirement accounts, such as individual retirement accounts (IRA’s) or 401(k) plans. The longer you wait to withdraw this money, the more you can potentially benefit from tax-deferred or tax-free (for Roth accounts) compounding.  Instead, tap into taxable accounts first. (general investments)
  • Adjust your withdrawal rate to help ensure that your savings will last throughout a lengthened retirement.  Financial planners typically recommend a 4%-5% annual withdrawal rate at retirement, but you may want to lower this since you will need your savings to last longer.
  • Structure your investments to include a significant growth element. Since your money will have to last longer, you will want to consider including stocks or other assets that carry high growth potential.  Stocks are typically more volatile than bonds or other fixed-income investments but have a better long-term record of outpacing inflation.

The first place to start early retirement planning is with a detailed plan that includes estimated income and expenses. Work with your financial advisor to put in place a plan that factors in all necessary elements you will want to consider.

 

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Michele Bjorkgren, Financial Advisor
Compass Financial
p. 515.327.1020 x13
e. michele.bjorkgren@compassiowa.com
Securities Offered through LPL Financial
Member FINRA/SIPC

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A little more about us:
Compass Financial is an independent, fee-based financial advisory firm in West Des Moines, Iowa. The Compass Team helps individuals and families develop an inspiring vision of their financial future and a realistic strategy.

By listening closely to our clients’ true needs, wants, hopes, desires and dreams we are able to combine Wealth Management and broad Financial Planning customized to each individual situation. It’s our goal to assist you in developing a personalized financial road map. The results from the process should include confidence that comes from planning. As we all know, life happens, sometimes ambushing the best laid plans. Accepting a new reality and adapting the financial plan is work we have done many times for our clients.

We also offer Financial Check Up or Second Opinion Services to those who want to enhance the service they are already receiving. This should lead to a better understanding of your current plans and give added confidence to your existing advisor relationship.

Sometimes life’s biggest challenges come in the form of transitions, retirement, marriage, health issues, divorce, unexpected loss, or even college savings. Our team at Compass has experienced many of these life transitions, it’s our hope to come alongside you and your family. These defining moments of life provide opportunities to implement financial strategies that can have long lasting impact. The first step is always the most difficult, but can also be the most rewarding. Please Contact Us today to receive your free, no obligation, one hour initial consultation!

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